Zachary James Van Winkle

Life Course Trajectories and Wealth Accumulation in the United States: Comparing Baby Boomers and Millennials

This paper empirically assesses the widespread belief that Millennials are economically worse off than their parents’ generation, the Baby Boomers. The research used US data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to analyse the work and family life courses of Millennials and Baby Boomers from age 18 to 35, and then … Read more

Family Size and the Persistency of Poverty following Divorce: The United States in Comparative Perspective

This paper assesses how the short- and medium-term economic consequences of divorce on women vary by family size. It finds, surprisingly, that having children contributes to a woman’s economic recovery in the medium term. The researchers made use of household survey data in the US, UK, Germany, Australia and Switzerland and advanced modelling techniques to … Read more

The Complexity of Employment & Family Life Courses across 20th Century Europe: An Update

It is a common perception in public debate that lives have become more unstable over the past decades. The authors put this to a broad empirical test using data from 30 European countries to ask, whether family life and employment have indeed become more unstable over time, or if differences across countries remain greater. The … Read more

Parenthood Wage Gaps across the Life-Course: An Intersectional Comparison by Gender and Race

This paper investigates the wage penalties and premiums for parents and how they play out over their lives depending on how many children they have and their race and gender. The research uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97) to map parenthood wage gaps for men and women aged 20-45 … Read more