Journal Article

The UK government LGBT Action Plan: Discourses of progress, enduring stasis, and LGBTQI+ lives ‘getting better’

This paper critiques the ‘unprecedented progress’ for LGBTQI+ rights and realities presented in the UK Government’s LGBT Action Plan (2018). It also examines key speeches from politicians to launch the Plan and finds that claims of lives getting better do not always hold up to scrutiny nor match the lived experiences of individuals. The analysis … Read more

Family Life Courses, Gender, and Mid-Life Earnings

This paper suggests that extensive Nordic family friendly policies designed to support work – family balance and to increase social and gender equality do not achieve the aim of minimising earnings inequalities between men and women and between different family types. Using Finnish register data on 6,621 men and 6,330 women born between 1969 and … Read more

Divorce and Diverging Poverty Rates: A Risk‐and‐Vulnerability Approach

This study offers a new approach to analyzing life course inequalities and applies it to the link between divorce and poverty. Previous research has suggested that divorce drives cumulative inequality between education groups during the life course. Two pathways play a role in this process: the educational gradient in the risk of divorce and the … Read more

Destination as a process: Sibling similarity in early socioeconomic trajectories

This paper finds that when trying to better understand how individuals achieve a social position, it is key to consider not just where they start and finish, but how their lives unfold and change over time. The research makes use of rich Finnish register data to compare the education, work and earnings between the ages … Read more

Family, Firms, and Fertility: A Study of Social Interaction Effects

This research shows that when an individual has a baby can be directly linked to the fertility decisions not only of their closest family and colleagues but of wider networks. The findings demonstrate for the first time and in a robust way, a clear fertility spillover effect from family to the workplace and vice versa. … Read more

Aiming High and Missing the Mark? Educational Choice, Dropout Risk, and Achievement in Upper Secondary Education among Children of Immigrants in Denmark

This paper finds that high aspiration among young people from ethnic minority backgrounds can be a double-edged sword: it helps close the gap between these young people and their native-origin peers, but at the cost of higher drop-out rates. The research looks at the choices made by Danish youngsters at the age of 16, when … Read more

Discrimination in the hiring of older jobseekers: Combining a survey experiment with a natural experiment in Switzerland

This paper looks at different explanations for why older jobseekers may struggle to find a new job if they are out of work, and concludes that this group is at a significant disadvantage when compared to younger workers with similar qualifications. The researchers tested three theories: that employers may prefer to recruit internally; that older … Read more

Long-term changes in married couples’ labor supply and taxes: Evidence from the US and Europe since the 1980s

This study uses large-scale survey data from Europe and the United States to ask what factors have affected decisions made by married couples about whether to work, and for how many hours. It finds income tax can influence women to work more hours. The researchers analysed data from the European Labour Force Survey and the … Read more