DIAL Working Papers

Can We Really Rely on Income Distribution Statistics? Some Issues in the Swedish Data

Authors: Anders Björklund,
Series: Issue: 7 2020

The Swedish Income Distribution Statistics have shown rising gaps in disposable income since the early 1980s. Several reports have shown that capital income is an important driver behind this development. I identify several weaknesses in the measurement of capital income in these statistics. One weakness is that realised capital gains, which generally are included in … Read more

The baby year parental leave reform in the GDR and its impact on children’s long-term life satisfaction

This article investigates the effects of an increase in paid parental leave — twelve months instead of five months — on children’s long-term life satisfaction. The historical setting under study, namely the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), allows us to circumvent problems of selection of women into the labor market and an insufficient or heterogeneous … Read more

Workplace Contact and Support for Anti-Immigration Parties

This paper studies the consequences of an increased presence of immigrants in the workplace on anti-immigration voting behavior by combining detailed Swedish workplace data with election outcomes for a large antiimmigration party (the Sweden Democrats). At each election precinct, we match the election outcomes with the share of non-European co-workers among the average native-born worker … Read more

No stratified effect of unemployment on incomes. How the market, state and household compensate for income loss in the UK and Switzerland

Unemployment is a critical life event that may affect the income trajectories of displaced workers very unequally. It may trigger a process of cumulative disadvantage and hit vulnerable groups hardest. Alternatively, it may level the playing field because higher classes have more to lose. We analyze heterogeneous effects of an unemployment spell on income for … Read more

Wages, Experience and Training of Women over the Lifecycle

Abstract We investigate the role of training in reducing the gender wage gap using the UK-BHPS which contains detailed records of training. Using policy changes over an 18 year period we identify the impact of training and work experience on wages, earnings and employment. Based on a lifecycle model and using reforms as a source … Read more

Rent Sharing and Inclusive Growth

Abstract The long-run evolution of rent sharing is studied. Based upon a comprehensive and harmonized panel of the top 300 publicly quoted British companies over thirty-five years, the paper reports evidence of a significant fall over time in the extent to which firms share rents with workers. It confirms that companies do share their profits … Read more

Between Communism and Capitalism: Long-term Inequality in Poland, 1892-2015

Abstract How has Polish inequality evolved between communism and capitalism to reach one of the highest levels in Europe today? To address this question, we construct the first consistent series on the long-term distribution of income in Poland by combining tax, household survey and national accounts data. We document a U-shaped evolution of inequalities from … Read more

Family Size and the Persistency of Poverty following Divorce: The United States in Comparative Perspective

Studies have documented the negative association between divorce and women’s economic wellbeing in several countries. Less is known about whether the effects of divorce on women’s economic wellbeing vary by family size and their persistency. However, larger families are likely more vulnerable to the economic consequences of divorce, and more children are exposed to these … Read more

The Complexity of Employment & Family Life Courses across 20th Century Europe: An Update

Whether work and family lives became more unstable over the past decades has been debated. Most studies on life course instability focus on single countries tracing birth cohorts over time. Two recent studies benchmarked change in employment and family instability over time against cross-national differences in 14 European countries. Findings showed minor increases in employment … Read more

Why is there an educational gradient in union dissolution? The strain thesis revisited

Lower educated individuals have less stable unions across many Western countries. This is in line with Goode’s (1962) thesis that lower educated individuals experience more economic strain and are therefore at higher risk of union dissolution. Nonetheless, micro-level evidence is weak. This may be due to a concept of strain that is too limited or … Read more