DIAL Working Papers

Family Background, Educational Qualifications and Meritocratic Labor Market Allocation: Evidence from Danish Siblings

This paper looks at how education and family background shapes the occupation and earnings of a generation of Danes, and concludes that education plays a powerful role in explaining why children from advantaged backgrounds have higher earnings than chil-dren from disadvantaged backgrounds. The researchers studied all children born in Denmark between 1965 and 1971 and … Read more

LGBTQI+ In/Exclusions: History Month, intersections, and research design

Matson Lawrence and Yvette Taylor reflect upon the events they participated in, as connected to the LGBTQI+ Lives Scotland project, and their plans for upcoming fieldwork in their CILIA-LGBTQI+ blog post. To read more click here.

Can We Really Rely on Income Distribution Statistics? Some Issues in the Swedish Data

Authors: Anders Björklund,
Series: Issue: 7 2020
Themes:

The Swedish Income Distribution Statistics have shown rising gaps in disposable income since the early 1980s. Several reports have shown that capital income is an important driver behind this development. I identify several weaknesses in the measurement of capital income in these statistics. One weakness is that realised capital gains, which generally are included in … Read more

The baby year parental leave reform in the GDR and its impact on children’s long-term life satisfaction

This paper finds that children who spend 12 months at home with their mother after being born become adults who are more satisfied with life than those who spend just 5 months at home or in childcare. The study analyses the effects of reforms in the former German Democratic Republic where, in 1976, mothers with … Read more

Workplace Contact and Support for Anti-Immigration Parties

This paper asks whether support for anti-immigration political parties increases or decreases when native-born voters work alongside migrants. It finds that working together significantly reduces opposition to immigration and this leads to lower support for those parties. The researchers used detailed data from three million people in almost 6,000 electoral precincts across Sweden. All of … Read more

No stratified effect of unemployment on incomes. How the market, state and household compensate for income loss in the UK and Switzerland

This paper looks at the loss of income in the two years after unemployment in the UK and in Switzerland and finds that while lower income groups are more vulnerable to becoming unemployed they are not necessarily more vulnerable to its consequences. The researchers used data on more than 35,000 people who took part in … Read more

Wages, Experience and Training of Women over the Lifecycle

This paper finds that on-the-job training can help mitigate some of the negative career effects of having children, especially for women who left education at the end of high school. The researchers used data from 18 waves of the British Household Panel Survey between 1991 and 2008, which contains information on the employment, education, training … Read more

Rent Sharing and Inclusive Growth

The long-run evolution of rent sharing is studied. Based upon a comprehensive and harmonized panel of the top 300 publicly quoted British companies over thirty-five years, the paper reports evidence of a significant fall over time in the extent to which firms share rents with workers. It confirms that companies do share their profits with … Read more

Between Communism and Capitalism: Long-term Inequality in Poland, 1892-2015

Abstract How has Polish inequality evolved between communism and capitalism to reach one of the highest levels in Europe today? To address this question, we construct the first consistent series on the long-term distribution of income in Poland by combining tax, household survey and national accounts data. We document a U-shaped evolution of inequalities from … Read more

Family Size and the Persistency of Poverty following Divorce: The United States in Comparative Perspective

This paper assesses how the short- and medium-term economic consequences of divorce on women vary by family size. It finds, surprisingly, that having children contributes to a woman’s economic recovery in the medium term. The researchers made use of household survey data in the US, UK, Germany, Australia and Switzerland and advanced modelling techniques to … Read more