Is Social Inequality in Cognitive Outcomes Increased by Preterm Birth–Related Complications?

Dieter Wolke writes in an editorial about the relationship between maternal socioeconomic status and children’s cognitive outcomes among preterm children. He re-emphasizes what was emphasized already 40 years ago – the need to study the effect of family, social, and caretaking as risk factors in developmental outcomes among children born at high neonatal risk.

Wages, Experience and Training of Women over the Lifecycle

This paper finds that on-the-job training can help mitigate some of the negative career effects of having children, especially for women who left education at the end of high school. The researchers used data from 18 waves of the British Household Panel Survey between 1991 and 2008, which contains information on the employment, education, training … Read more

The UK government LGBT Action Plan: Discourses of progress, enduring stasis, and LGBTQI+ lives ‘getting better’

Authors: ,
Issue: 2019
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This paper critiques the ‘unprecedented progress’ for LGBTQI+ rights and realities presented in the UK Government’s LGBT Action Plan (2018). It also examines key speeches from politicians to launch the Plan and finds that claims of lives getting better do not always hold up to scrutiny nor match the lived experiences of individuals. The analysis … Read more

Family Life Courses, Gender, and Mid-Life Earnings

This paper suggests that extensive Nordic family friendly policies designed to support work – family balance and to increase social and gender equality do not achieve the aim of minimising earnings inequalities between men and women and between different family types. Using Finnish register data on 6,621 men and 6,330 women born between 1969 and … Read more

Rent Sharing and Inclusive Growth

This paper looks at the extent to which wages are affected by profits in major British firms – a process known as ‘rent-sharing.’ It finds this happens on a much smaller scale today than it did in the 1980s and 1990s. The researchers used data from a panel of the top 300 publicly-quoted British companies … Read more

Between Communism and Capitalism: Long-term Inequality in Poland, 1892-2015

Authors: ,
Series: Issue: 2 2020
Themes:

This paper looks at the evolution of inequality in Poland from the late 19th Century to the early 21st Century, by constructing the long-term distribution of income in Poland from combining tax, household survey and national accounts data. It documents a U-shaped evolution of inequalities from the end of the 19th century until today: (i) … Read more

Divorce and Diverging Poverty Rates: A Risk‐and‐Vulnerability Approach

This study offers a new approach to analyzing life course inequalities and applies it to the link between divorce and poverty. Previous research has suggested that divorce drives cumulative inequality between education groups during the life course. Two pathways play a role in this process: the educational gradient in the risk of divorce and the … Read more

Destination as a process: Sibling similarity in early socioeconomic trajectories

This paper finds that when trying to better understand how individuals achieve a social position, it is key to consider not just where they start and finish, but how their lives unfold and change over time. The research makes use of rich Finnish register data to compare the education, work and earnings between the ages … Read more

Family, Firms, and Fertility: A Study of Social Interaction Effects

This research shows that when an individual has a baby can be directly linked to the fertility decisions not only of their closest family and colleagues but of wider networks. The findings demonstrate for the first time and in a robust way, a clear fertility spillover effect from family to the workplace and vice versa. … Read more

Aiming High and Missing the Mark? Educational Choice, Dropout Risk, and Achievement in Upper Secondary Education among Children of Immigrants in Denmark

This paper finds that high aspiration among young people from ethnic minority backgrounds can be a double-edged sword: it helps close the gap between these young people and their native-origin peers, but at the cost of higher drop-out rates. The research looks at the choices made by Danish youngsters at the age of 16, when … Read more